MCRC Photos
Marine Corps Recruiting Command Photos
Two Marines with the 9th Marine Corps District, based out of Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois, were on hand to honor four Montford Point Marines, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
While on her way to a training event to prepare future Marines for basic training, Prieto noticed three suspicious individuals attempting to conceal shotguns while crossing onto Hemlock Pass, a highway in Ocala. When Prieto recognized the suspicious activity and called out to question them, they ran. Prieto immediately dropped off her future Marines at a safe location and pursued the suspects on foot for two miles, continuously updating the police by cell phone.
U.S. Marines at Recruiting Sub-Station Fullerton, Recruiting Station Orange County, pose for a photo with future Marine Luis Solano in Fullerton, California, on April 15, 2021. Marines at RSS Fullerton came together in order to assist Solano’s family with assistance in fixing their van, and providing him with a cell phone. (U.S. Marine Corps photo taken by Sgt. Sarah Ralph)
Zuzy Hall, the Marine Corps Recruiting Command Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, and Staff Sgt. Angelica Pulliam, one of MCRC’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates, post the MCRC G-1 section's  SAPR awareness physical exercise completion time on a board at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, April 15, 2021. The ladies coordinated both a physical and a mental challenge for MCRC headquarters’ personnel to participate in during the month of April as part of the Marine Corps’ 17th Annual Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month. The physical challenge coupled learning SAPR statistics with a set of exercises. For example, an American is sexually assaulted every 73 seconds. In recognition, personnel were challenged to complete 73 squats as part of the exercise. The physical challenge consisted of nine different exercises. (US Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Naomi May)
The Marine Corps Recruiting Command G-1 section participates in a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response awareness physical exercise at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, April 15, 2021. Zuzy Hall, the MCRC Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, and Staff Sgt. Angelica Pulliam, one of MCRC’s SAPR Victim Advocates, coordinated both a physical and a mental challenge for MCRC headquarters’ personnel to participate in during the month of April as part of the Marine Corps’ 17th Annual Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month. The physical challenge coupled learning SAPR statistics with a set of exercises. For example, an American is sexually assaulted every 73 seconds. In recognition, personnel were challenged to complete 73 squats as part of the exercise. The physical challenge consisted of nine different exercises. (US Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Naomi May)
The Marine Corps Recruiting Command G-1 section participates in a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response awareness physical exercise at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, April 15, 2021. Zuzy Hall, the MCRC Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, and Staff Sgt. Angelica Pulliam, one of MCRC’s SAPR Victim Advocates, coordinated both a physical and a mental challenge for MCRC headquarters’ personnel to participate in during the month of April as part of the Marine Corps’ 17th Annual Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month. The physical challenge coupled learning SAPR statistics with a set of exercises. For example, an American is sexually assaulted every 73 seconds. In recognition, personnel were challenged to complete 73 squats as part of the exercise. The physical challenge consisted of nine different exercises. (US Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Naomi May)
U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Sawyer M. Montgomery, a temporary officer selection assistant with Recruiting Station Orange County, poses for a photo on April 12, 2021, in Santa Ana, California. Montgomery is one of the select few Marine Corps officers who is aspiring to become a Marine Corps pilot. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Sarah Ralph)
U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Sawyer M. Montgomery, a temporary officer selection assistant with Recruiting Station Orange County, poses for a photo on April 12, 2021, in Santa Ana, California. Montgomery is one of the select few Marine Corps officers who is aspiring to become a Marine Corps pilot. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Sarah Ralph)
U.S. Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Jason Oliver, a recruiter with Recruiting Station Frederick and 4th Marine Corps District recruiter of the quarter, completes a hike during a monthly pool function for Recruiting Substation Martinsburg in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, March 16, 2021. The monthly pool functions are preformed to both build rapport between poolees and recruiters and to prepare them mentally and physically for the rigors of Marine Corps recruit training.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ryan Sammet)
U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt. Hanna E. Alexander, a temporary officer selection assistant with Recruiting Station Orange County, poses for a photo on March 5, 2021 in Santa Ana, California. Alexander and other female Marines gathered at RS Orange County in order to celebrate National Women's History Month. Women's History Month is impactful to women in the Corps because it allows them to acknowledge the milestones that Marines have gone through in order to get to where they are today. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Sarah Ralph)
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Ravein S. Price Fitzgerald, a supply clerk with Recruiting Station Orange County, poses for a photo on March 5, 2021 in Santa Ana, California. Price Fitzgerald and fellow Marines gathered at RS Orange County in order to celebrate National Women's History Month. Women's History Month is impactful to women in the Corps because it allows them to acknowledge the milestones that Marines have gone through in order to get to where they are today. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Sarah Ralph)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Margarita G. Aguirre, an administrative clerk with Recruiting Station Orange County, poses for a photo on March 5, 2021 in Santa Ana, California. Aguirre and fellow Marines gathered at RS Orange County to celebrate National Women's History Month. Women's History Month is impactful to women in the Corps because it allows them to acknowledge the milestones that Marines have gone through in order to get to where they are today. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Sarah Ralph)
Lt. Col. Sally Ann Falco holds photos of two of her female Marine mentors, retired Sgt. Maj. Tammy Fodey and retired Sgt. Maj. Sarah Thornton, the first woman Marine to retire after 30 consecutive years of active service. Falco served as an enlisted Marine for 14 years before her acceptance to the Meritorious Commissioning Program. She commissioned in August 2001 and will soon retire after 34 fruitful years in the Marine Corps. “I’ve just been privileged to be allowed to be a Marine,” Falco said. “I still love it as much as the day I came in, and I would stay in forever, but I want to make room for others to climb the ladder and at the same time, contribute to society in another capacity.” (US Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Naomi May)
U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Gabra A. Bailey, a supply officer with 12th Marine Corps District, poses in his office at the district headquarters located at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego on March 4, 2021. Bailey was born and raised in Kingston, Jamaica before immigrating to the United States and becoming a Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Tessa D. Watts)
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Shaquira N. Dailey, an operations clerk with Recruiting Station Orange County, poses for a photo on March 5, 2021 in Santa Ana, California. Dailey and fellow Marines gathered at RS Orange County in order to celebrate National Women's History Month. Women's History Month is impactful to women in the Corps because it allows them to acknowledge the milestones that Marines have gone through in order to get to where they are today. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Sarah Ralph)
In honor of women's history month, this photo illustration features U.S. Marine Capt. Anneliese Satz, the first female Marine F-35B pilot. Satz graduated the F-35B Lighting II Pilot Training Program on June 27, 2019 with over 300 flight hours under her belt. This is just one of many historical milestones of women in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo illustration by Cpl. Phuchung Nguyen)
Staff Sgt. Andre Babineaux, a Marine with  Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 501, is a prior active duty Marine who is now part of the Marine Corps Reserves.
Opha May Johnson became the first woman to enlist in the Marine Corps on August 13, 1918, when she joined the Marine Corps Reserve during World War I. She was the first of more than 300 women to enlist in the Marine Corps Reserve during World War I and was 39 years old at enlistment. This graphic was created in honor of Women's History Month and the service of women everywhere. (U.S. Marine Corps graphic created by Lance Cpl. Kindo Go)
Lt. Col. Sally Ann Falco's father, Kenneth Townes, holds a photo of Falco taken while she was at recruit training in 1987 at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina. Falco served as an enlisted Marine for 14 years before her acceptance to the Meritorious Commissioning Program. She commissioned in August 2001 and will soon retire after 34 fruitful years in the Marine Corps. “I’ve just been privileged to be allowed to be a Marine,” Falco said. “I still love it as much as the day I came in, and I would stay in forever, but I want to make room for others to climb the ladder and at the same time, contribute to society in another capacity.” (Courtesy photo by Falco's mother, Loretta "Tootsie" Townes)
Marine Corps Recruiting Command's commanding general, Maj.Gen. Jason Bohm, and sergeant major, Sgt. Maj. Cortez Brown, speak on the COVID-19 vaccine Feb. 22, 2021 on Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia. As the vaccine is becoming more available to the military and civilians, some recruiters have questions about the vaccine. This video addresses some questions about the vaccine and encourages people to voluntarily opt in for the safety of the communities where they live and serve.