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Marine Corps Recruiting Command

Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va.

3280 Russell Road, 2nd Floor Quantico, Va. 22134
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New video shows off what NROTC has to offer

By Pfc. David Flynn | Marine Corps Recruiting Command | December 29, 2010

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SWARTZ CREEK, Mich. - Capt. Elgin Young, operations officer, and Sgt. Eric Snow, canvassing recruiter, RS Lansing, Mich. present a high school student with the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps scholarship May 15, 2007, at Swartz Creek High School. A new video released Dec. 16 offers a glimpse into the life of students currently enrolled in the NROTC program.

SWARTZ CREEK, Mich. - Capt. Elgin Young, operations officer, and Sgt. Eric Snow, canvassing recruiter, RS Lansing, Mich. present a high school student with the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps scholarship May 15, 2007, at Swartz Creek High School. A new video released Dec. 16 offers a glimpse into the life of students currently enrolled in the NROTC program. (Photo by Sgt. Donald Bohanner)


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MOUNTAIN WARFARE TRANING CENTER BRIDGEPORT, Calif. - College students enrolled in the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program walk with their arms linked together as they cross a stream July 5, 2009. Students interested in becoming Marine officers can learn more about NROTC from instructors, graduates and current students in the program in a new video released Dec. 16.

MOUNTAIN WARFARE TRANING CENTER BRIDGEPORT, Calif. - College students enrolled in the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program walk with their arms linked together as they cross a stream July 5, 2009. Students interested in becoming Marine officers can learn more about NROTC from instructors, graduates and current students in the program in a new video released Dec. 16. (Photo by Lance Cpl. M. C. Nerl)


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MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. -- Marine Corps Recruiting Command released “Graduate a Leader of Warriors,” a video detailing the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps scholarship, as well as the experiences of college students currently attending school through the program Dec. 16.

Two versions of the video have been made. An eight minute version will be shown to high school juniors and seniors who are in college preparatory classes or plan on attending college. The four minute version is available to be viewed on www.MarineOfficer.com by anyone.

“Students will see what the program has to offer in the video,” said Master Sgt. Chad Isom, advertising chief, MCRC. “Active duty Marines who have already completed the program, Marine Corps recruiters and students currently enrolled in the program share their experiences to inform students who are unaware of NROTC.”

To qualify for an NROTC scholarship, applicants must be U.S. citizens between the ages of 17 and 23, meet Marine Corps standards of physical fitness, have an SAT score of 1,000 or an ACT composite score of 22 and apply to a university that has an NROTC program.

Over 150 universities across the United States offer the NROTC programs, including some of the most prestigious schools in the country. Applicants can attend schools such as Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Notre Dame, the University of Southern California, Auburn and Cornell.

“As high school students near graduation and have their sights squarely set on college, they have the opportunity to earn a scholarship while pursuing service as a Marine,” said Isom. 

The scholarship covers classes and books for students. It has a potential value of $150,000, depending on the school a student attends.

“Many students, although eligible for college, have limited options to pay for it,” said Isom. “The scholarship provides a way to pay for tuition and books while also teaching students the skills and leadership abilities of a Marine officer."

Once accepted to the program, students are required to take classes in naval sciences, and participate in military training. Though students receive training during the school year, the majority of it comes during their summers in the program.

In the summer after freshman year, students attend a four week “cruise,” where they are attached to military units and learn the history, capabilities and mission of the United States Navy and Marine Corps. Students spend one week aboard a Navy vessel, another week is spent learning about air warfare and one is spent learning underwater warfare. Marine option students, depending on geographic location, will also spend a week at Camp Lejeune, N.C., or Camp Pendleton, Calif., receiving Marine Corps focused training.

During the summer after their sophomore year, Marine option NROTC students have the opportunity to attend high altitude and cold weather movement and survival training at Mountain Warfare Training Center, Bridgeport, Calif.

Finally, in the summer after their junior year, Marine option NROTC students attend Officer Candidate School here for six weeks. OCS challenges candidates mentally and physically and puts everything they have learned the past three years to the test.
Capt. Adam Scott, head of regular officer programs, MCRC, went to college through the NROTC program.
“I went to Virginia Tech and graduated in 2002,” said Scott. “NROTC is a great way to prepare for the challenges and environment of the military.”

Upon graduation from college, NROTC students are commissioned ensigns or second lieutenants in the United States Navy or Marine Corps. Most graduates are obligated to serve four years active duty and four years individual ready reserve. Marines in flight training may be obligated to serve longer due to longer training requirements.

For more information on NROTC or becoming a Marine officer, visit www.MarineOfficer.com

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